Today’s post is a continuation of our series on INTERPOL’s CCF, its annual reports, and what the information in those reports might mean for a Red Notice subject seeking to have a Red Notice removed.

In the CCF most recent annual report, the Commission conveyed its observations about a variety of subjects, including a growing

In our continued series on reviewing the CCF’s most recent annual report, found here, today’s post addresses the CCF’s workload, and how that might impact a request for a Red Notice removal.

The CCF reported that in 2018, it reviewed the 1,422 finalized cases, including 536 complaints, 741 access requests, 97 applications for revision,

In the current series of posts, I’ll examine the CCF’s most recent annual report, and what that report means for Red Notice subjects who are applying to have their notices removed or corrected.

The CCF issues its annual reports for the previous years at INTERPOL’s annual assembly. The most current report available is the one

The United States Department of Justice Board of Immigration Appeals recently ruled that a Red Notice “may constitute reliable evidence that indicates the serious nonpolitical crime bar for asylum and withholding of removal applies to an alien.”

This means that the Red Notice itself may be viewed by immigration officials as a sufficient reason to

The concerns held by Red Notice subjects who are working towards the removal of their Red Notices now also include the effect of the Coronavirus on the progress of their cases. While we cannot predict everything to come, here’s what we do know:

  • The work required to challenge a Red Notice is largely capable of

(Today’s post is courtesy of guest author, Isabel Alcántara*)

According to INTERPOL’s most recent Annual Report, police worldwide searched INTERPOL’s databases 5.4 billion times in 2018 [this is an increase of 18% from 2017]. The increase may be due to the implementation of new systems, such as:

• The STADIA Knowledge Management System, which supports

INTERPOL assists in locating and extraditing people wanted for prosecution or to serve sentences in criminal cases. Matters of a civil nature are not matters within the scope of INTERPOL’s organization. However, sometimes cultural differences – and the accompanying legislative differences- create stark distinctions between the types of matters that countries consider to be criminal.

One of the most frequent concerns cited by our Red Notice clients is what could happen even if they succeed in their efforts to remove a Red Notice. Most people who challenge Red Notices do so because they have tried to resolve the matter at the country of origin and failed, or because the country

Warning: cynics should skip this post. It is an unabashed professional letter of admiration. In my many years as a criminal defense attorney, I have encountered a few inspiring advocates who are wholly dedicated to their craft and their clients; this post is about some of them. 

The world of INTERPOL is rather small. While