Commission for the Control of INTERPOL's Files

Today’s post is a continuation of our series on INTERPOL’s CCF, its annual reports, and what the information in those reports might mean for a Red Notice subject seeking to have a Red Notice removed.

In the CCF most recent annual report, the Commission conveyed its observations about a variety of subjects, including a growing

Some of the best advice I ever received was from a professor who told my law school class to “knock off the legal mumbo-jumbo” and just speak plainly, so people can understand you.  When lawyers speak in legal-ese or in industry terms, the only people who really understand them are other lawyers, and other people

INTERPOL has planned its 82nd General Assembly meeting for next month in Colombia.  To get right to the point, out of all the planned events for the meeting, I am most interested in reading about the presentation of the Annual Report by the Commission for the Control of INTERPOL’s Files (CCF). Traditionally, the CCF’s report

When INTERPOL introduced its I-link system, the goal of the system was to provide its member countries with near-instant access to one another’s shared information about wanted subjects.  While that goal clearly has been met, it hasn’t been without some bumps in the road.  

Along with the benefit of instant access come the

The process for seeking relief from an improperly issued Red Notice currently requires that the request be reviewed by the Commission for the Control of INTERPOL’s Files.  The Commission is made up of five individuals from specific professional backgrounds who, for the purposes of their assignments, act solely in the interest of INTERPOL and without

As INTERPOL has developed over time, it has experienced the growing pains that normally attend any large and relatively complex entity, and also some that are more specific to its own, unusual functions.  In his book that I love, The Legal Foundations of INTERPOL, Rutsel Silvestre J. Martha touched on one of these developments:

In a continuation of the discussion of the current Venezuelan Red Notice situation, I thought it interesting to consider INTERPOL’S public explanation of two matters:  first, the historic visit by Ronald K. Noble, INTERPOL’s Secretary General, to Venezuela early this month, and second, the possible reasons for INTERPOL’s denial of Venezuela’s Red Notice requests.

Why the