INTERPOL's Infrastructure

INTERPOL’s next Secretary General, Jürgen Stock, was officially elected this past Friday at the organization’s annual General Assembly.  Back in June of this year, INTERPOL’s Executive Committee chose Mr. Stock as its candidate to succeed Ronald Noble in INTERPOL’s “CEO” position.

INTERPOL’s President Mireille  Ballestrazzi welcomed the election of the new Secretary General, and said:

INTERPOL has a new Chairperson for the Commission for the Control of INTERPOL’s Files, which is the quasi-appellate arm of the organization.  Nina Vajić  assumed her new post as Chairperson in September.

INTERPOL’s announcement regarding Ms.Vajić’s new term is found here.  In her primary profession, she is a professor of Human Rights Law at

INTERPOL’s current Secretary General, Ronald Noble, will serve in his position until 2015, when his third term as Secretary General ends.  

INTERPOL’s Executive Committee has chosen Juergen Stock as the candidate who is likely to become Noble’s successor.  His background and qualifications are summarized here, on INTERPOL’s website.

The selection process is explained

This is the second in a series of posts addressing the current call for INTERPOL’s reform.

Fair Trials International recently released a report containing its recommendations for change to INTERPOL’s current system.  The report, found here, includes two major areas for reform:

1.  Protection from abuse of INTERPOL’s tools by member countries, and

2.

This is the second in a series of posts addressing the current call for INTERPOL’s reform

Fair Trials International recently released a report containing its recommendations for change to INTERPOL’s current system.  The report, found here, includes two major areas for reform:

1.  Protection from abuse of INTERPOL’s tools by member countries, and

2.

(This is the fourth  post in a series about the CCF’s Annual Report for 2012)

 

In his speech to the General Assembly last month, the Chairman of the Commission for the Control of INTERPOL’s Files raised several issues for the GA’s consideration, and among them was the invitation to work with the General Secretariat

(This is the third post in a series about the CCF’s 2012 Annual Report)

Each year, the Commission for the Control of INTERPOL’s Files (CCF) submits its annual report at the General Assembly meeting.  The report is normally presented by the the Chairman of the Commission in conjunction with his annual speech.

This year, Chairman

The Commission for the Control of INTERPOL’s files has just issued its 2012 Annual Report.  The report provides information regarding the CCF’s activities over the last year.  It also includes statistics on the CCF’s decisions in cases that it considered during its three sessions in 2012.

Over the next several posts, I will address

In the 2011 film version of The Adventures of Tintin:  the Secret ofthe Unicorn, part of the plot concerned two detectives who were “INTERPOL agents” investigating a crime.  The two detectives look very similar to one another and are portrayed as more or less bumbling, ineffective agents.  

This was an animated film, so

I received a question from a reader this week who was interested in knowing which countries were actually INTERPOL member countries.  INTERPOL keeps an updated list of its member countries on its website on this page.  Each member country has its own page of facts and relevant information.  Many also have links to press